Sunday, September 5, 2010

Step-by-step, tunisian in the round

For my second experiment with a Tunisian in the round can cozie, a made only one minor change for the base.  This time, I worked in a spiral from the start.

I also decided to do with one in stockinette stitch.

Tunisian in the round.

Where the simple stitch is worked from right to left around the front vertical bar, the stockinette stitch is worked from front to back, in between the front and back vertical bars.  The finished result looks very much like the knit version.

To work in the round, only a few loops of yarn A are placed on the hook at a time.



Tunisian in the round.

The work is then turned and slip to the other end of the hook.  The loops are then worked off the hook using yarn B until only 2 or 3 loops of yarn A are left on the hook.





Tunisian in the round.

The work is then turned again, slid back to the opposite hook, and yarn A is picked up again to work several more loops back onto the hook.  In this photo, you can see the front loops of the last round of sc in the base.


Tunisian in the round.

As the piece is worked, the first few rounds seem very wide and bowl like.  After an inch or so, it starts to take on a more upright shape.  The vertical rows created by the stockinette stitch give it a bit more structure than the simple stitch did.

Tunisian in the round.

A view of the inside.

Tunisian in the round.

Another view of the outside.  Note the distinctive Tunisian crochet curl at the top.

Tunisian in the round.

I used a can to determine when to stop.  For this project, I stopped just a bit short of the final hieght I was after.



Tunisian in the round.

An inside view of the last round, uncurled as much as I could.



Tunisian in the round.

This time I did a round of sc at the top, working the stitches in the same space I worked the stockinette stitch through, using only the primary colour yarn.


Tunisian in the round.

Which looks like this on the inside.



Tunisian in the round.

The final round of sc was done using both colours of yarn on the hook.



Tunisian in the round.

Which looks like this on the inside.




Tunisian in the round.

Then I flipped it inside out to sew in all the loose ends.










The finished cozie. 


Final conclusion: For a can cozie, there are a couple of things I might do different.  I would probably stick with the 6.00 mm hook for the body, but the top is a lot looser than I like.  If I did it again, I would use a smaller hook for the last two rounds at the top.  I might prefer to do the whole thing in a smaller hook, as the cozie is more flexible than I like.  It's more likely to collapse when putting a can into it without using a second hand to hold it open.  On the other hand, this makes it more versatile for use on drinking glasses, which might flare wider at the top or be slightly wider and a pop can, or for small water bottles.


The finished fabric is quite a bit thicker than using a regular hook.  Which would be a plus (better insulation) or a minus (uses quite a bit more yarn), depending on what you're after. 


I do like the look of it, and working in the round does eliminate the lean to one side Tunisian usually has.  It does still curl, but not as much as flat work, and can be easily remedied without blocking.


There is a finicky factor when working in the round, since only a few stitches can be worked at a time before it has to be flipped to the other end of the hook.  This would be less of an issue if doing something larger, like a cap, since more loops can be worked onto the hook.


I like it.  Enough that I'll probably make more of these, or try some other experiments.

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